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the Degree Confluence Project
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Niger : Agadez

87.8 km (54.5 miles) S of I-n-Gall, Agadez, Niger
Approx. altitude: 531 m (1742 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 16°S 173°W

Accuracy: 5 m (16 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: John, Warren and Carlos with the two Wodabe Fulanis #3: Looking south past the Confluence and our convoy #4: Some pieces of bleached wood found framing the Confluence #5: Looking east from the Confluence #6: Our two Wodabe friends

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  16°N 7°E  

#1: Looking west from the Confluence

(visited by J. Baker Hill, Carlos Benitez, Warren Hessling, Clive Cook and John Staniforth)

21-Apr-2002 -- On a convoy trip to Agadez in the Sahara of Niger, I made plans to visit a Confluence located a couple of kilometers from this fabled desert city. I saw another Confluence located near the road north to Agadez but as it was some 12 kilometers from the road marked on my basemap and I was with 4 other people I did not think it would be possible to visit that one. It was 16N 7E.

However, on the trip up, about 150 kilometers from Agadez, I happened to check the coordinates and found I was hardly any distance from the point. Apparently the basemap was based on sources that used the old unpaved road. Our track went just over 2 kilometers from the Confluence. It was getting late on the way up so I determined to find the Confluence on the way back.

We spent two days in Agadez and headed back south early on a Sunday morning. We were in two vehicles, one of which was my trusty Suzuki, so I was not worried about a little off-roading, especially since the terrain was desert. Everyone in the party agreed to humor this nutty confluence-hunter, and when we were abreast of the Confluence and some three kilometers north of the village of Agabar-gabar (pronounced somewhat like a turkey-gobble), I turned off the road and began to follow the pointer. The terrain was easy compared to some I have done and we made good time across the desert.

About 300 meters from the Confluence we spotted a camel that appeared to be standing very near it. I slowed down hoping to get the camel in my viewfinder, but as the vehicles approached he kicked up his heels and fled. We stopped just a few meters from the point, which seemed already to have been framed by a couple of pieces of bleached wood. As I took some snapshots a couple of fellows belonging to the Wodabe or Bororo branch of the Fulani tribe strolled up. We did not have any common language among us even though our group of two Brits, two Americans, and a Puerto Rican speaks a total of 6 or 8 different languages, but they were friendly enough and agreed to pose for a picture with the group. We had no way of explaining to them that their picture would be seen all around the world on the Internet! Their group is somewhat renowned for the fact that it is the men who dress up and wear makeup almost to the same extent as the women!

After a few minutes we loaded up and headed back to the pavement. Those new to confluence-hunting agreed that it was not that bad after all!


 All pictures
#1: Looking west from the Confluence
#2: John, Warren and Carlos with the two Wodabe Fulanis
#3: Looking south past the Confluence and our convoy
#4: Some pieces of bleached wood found framing the Confluence
#5: Looking east from the Confluence
#6: Our two Wodabe friends
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)