W
NW
N
N
NE
W
the Degree Confluence Project
E
SW
S
S
SE
E

United Arab Emir.

22.7 km (14.1 miles) ESE of Farīq Tarīf, Abū Zaby, U. A. E.
Approx. altitude: 4 m (13 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 24°S 126°W

Accuracy: 5 m (16 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: 24N 54E, View to the West. #3: 24N 54E, View to the North. #4: 24N 54E, View to the East. #5: 24N 54E, GPS reading. #6: 24N 54E, Sunset over our "rooftop bed". #7: 24N 54E, Lise dancing on the sabkha.

  { Main | Search | Countries | Information | Member Page | Random }

  24°N 54°E (visit #1)  

#1: 24N 54E, View to the South. We see very clearly the waves of the sabkha.

(visited by Marc Lamontagne and Lise Roussel)

English version

Français

24-Fév-2002 -- Nous étions très heureux lorsque nous avons atteint le point de confluence 24N 54E. Nous avons eu bien peur de se retrouver avec une autre tentative, après les deux dernières, celles des points 24N 52E et 24N 53E. Car le point 24N 54E se trouve en plein centre d'une immense sabkha *.

Après une visite à pied des premiers 100 mètres, nous nous risquons avec le véhicule. Surprise! Elle est tellement sèche et dure que nous roulons sans presque voir la trace de nos pneus. Nous roulons en ligne droite sur environ 7 km avant d'atteindre notre objectif.

Nous installons notre camp et pour souper nous dégustons des pâtes et un bon verre de vin. Biscuits au chocolat pour dessert autour du feu. Nous sommes à environ 100 km d'Abū Ẓaby où nous nous dirigerons demain matin après une bonne nuit de sommeil au milieu de la sabkha *.

* La sabkha est un marécage salé, parfois temporairement asséché, qui occupe le fond d'une dépression dans les régions désertiques. Lorsqu'elles sont asséchées, on ne peut jamais prédire si la surface est solide. Ca peut paraitre très dur et lorsqu'on s'y aventure avec un véhicule, il peut très bien caler tout d'un coup jusqu'à la hauteur des portes! Je l'ai vécu dans cette même région il y a 10 ans. La prudence est de mise.

English version

24-Feb-2002 -- We were very happy when we reached the 24N 54E confluence point. We were very scared to have to deal with another "attempt" after the latest two, 24N 52E and 24N 53E. Why were we afraid? Because the 24N 54E Confluence is situated in the middle of a boundless sabkha *.

After a walk onto the first 100 meters, we take the risk to drive the vehicle on it. Surprise! It is so hard and dry that we barely see our tires prints. So we drive onward for about 7 km before reaching our goal.

We set up the camp and for dinner we have nice pasta with a glass of wine. Then, chocolate cookies for dessert by the campfire. We are about 100 km from Abū Ẓaby, where we will head tomorrow morning, after a good sleep in the middle of the sabkha *.

* Sabkha is an arabic name for a salt-flat that has come into general use in sedimentology following classic research in the United Arab Emirates of the Arabian Gulf in the 1960s and later. They are flat and very saline areas of sand or silt lying just above the water-table. When they are dry, we cannot tell how hard is the surface. It could look like being solid but when we drive a vehicule on it, this one could suddenly sink into the mud to the bottom of the doors. It happened to me in this same area 10 years ago. It is necessary to be careful.


 All pictures
#1: 24N 54E, View to the South. We see very clearly the waves of the sabkha.
#2: 24N 54E, View to the West.
#3: 24N 54E, View to the North.
#4: 24N 54E, View to the East.
#5: 24N 54E, GPS reading.
#6: 24N 54E, Sunset over our "rooftop bed".
#7: 24N 54E, Lise dancing on the sabkha.
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)