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the Degree Confluence Project
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Australia : Tasmania

7.5 km (4.7 miles) E of Emita, Flinders Island, TAS, Australia
Approx. altitude: 81 m (265 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 40°N 32°W

Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: Looking East #3: Looking South #4: Looking West #5: GPS Showing Zeros #6: Geraldine and Ron at the confluence #7: Crossing 40 Degrees South Parallel #8: White Breasted Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) #9: Cape Baron Geese   (Cereopsis novaehollandiae) #10: Sub-species of the Common Wombat (Vombatus ursinus ursinus) found only on Flinders Island #11: Sculpted by the Roaring Forties

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  40°S 148°E (visit #2)  

#1: Looking North

(visited by Ron Henderson and Geraldine Hallahan)

28-Sep-2007 -- Following our visit to confluence 43°S and 147°E we made our way to Launceston where we caught a flight to Whitemark, Flinders Island a distance of approximately 151 km by air. Flinders Island is the largest of the Furneaux group of islands which lie at the eastern end of Bass Strait separating Tasmania from Victoria. The island is about 29 km wide at its widest point, and 64 km long. We were met at the airport by our friends (the main reason for our visit) and spent a number of days looking around with our friends as guides. At the time of our visit, one of our friends was actively involved in the annual Cape Baron Goose survey.

On the 28th of September, with the use of our friends’ car we travelled along the B85. We made our way north of Whitemark to Emita and turned right and followed the road until, guided by our GPS, we located where it intersected 148E. We deduced that the confluence was in a paddock and so we approached the farmer for permission before making our way to the actual site.

The necessary photos were taken in gale force winds. The camera and tripod was blown over a number of times before Geraldine successfully bagged the group photo. The experience brought home to us, in no uncertain terms, that we were in the ‘roaring forties’. There was a lot of evidence of this about in the way of damaged windmills and the wind sculpted trees.

The residents on Flinders are very proud of the fact that latitude 40 degrees south passes through their island. No one is left in ignorance of the fact because it is well sign posted and offers a great photo opportunity.

While on the island, we had a number of unique experiences. One was that we met a wild life carer who specialises in rescuing infant wombats. Ron and I had the pleasure of actually holding some of these tiny, but oh so solid, little fellows. Another unique experience was to see in the paddocks, not only the likes of sheep, cattle and horses, but large flocks of domestic turkeys gone wild. These are ‘fair game’ for anyone.

Interesting information on the island can be found at this link:- http://www.focusonflinders.com.au/about.htm


 All pictures
#1: Looking North
#2: Looking East
#3: Looking South
#4: Looking West
#5: GPS Showing Zeros
#6: Geraldine and Ron at the confluence
#7: Crossing 40 Degrees South Parallel
#8: White Breasted Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster)
#9: Cape Baron Geese (Cereopsis novaehollandiae)
#10: Sub-species of the Common Wombat (Vombatus ursinus ursinus) found only on Flinders Island
#11: Sculpted by the Roaring Forties
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)