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the Degree Confluence Project
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United States : Utah

2.6 miles (4.2 km) SSW of Ibapah, Tooele, UT, USA
Approx. altitude: 1645 m (5396 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo aerial world confnav)
Antipode: 40°S 66°E

Accuracy: 30 m (98 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: East from confluence #3: South from confluence #4: West from confluence #5: Deep Creek Mountains looking SE from confluence #6: Oak stake showing lats & lons, GPS, and compass #7: GPS showing 40 degrees North by 114 degrees West

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  40°N 114°W (visit #1)  

#1: North from confluence

(visited by Wayne Bickley)

15-May-2001 -- I found the confluence of 40 degrees north and 114 degrees west. It is located in western Utah near the Nevada state line, in the Ibapah Valley, about 2 miles south of the historic Pony Express Trail. That is the route that a young army officer by the name of Eisenhower, along with a small detachment of men and vehicles, took to cross the continent by motor vehicle just after World War I. The route then became known as the Lincoln Highway although it was nothing more than a stage road. The highway route was changed in the mid 1920's to run about 60 miles further north, so today the Ibapah Valley is a very isolated area. The only paved road begins in Nevada and dead-ends a few miles south of the confluence. I didn't meet or pass one vehicle during my entire time in that valley. Although a map lists both Ibapah and Goshute, neither is an actual town as there are no stores, services, etc. Each has several houses, a school and a church.

Another route to the valley would be the old Pony Express Trail beginning some 35 miles SW of Salt Lake City. It is a dirt road of 100 plus miles with no services, water, etc. Generally a good road in dry weather.

The map suggests that the easiest way to reach the confluence is to proceed south from Ibapah and then approach it from the east. I found that way to be impractical. It also requires trespassing over tribal grounds so if you choose to try it you must have permission. You will also have to walk through a marshy area and cross one of the many streams that flow from the Deep Creek Mountains to the southeast.

After inquiring of the Tribal Officers I found that the best approach would not involve crossing their grounds. I returned to Ibapah, took a dirt road west toward Nevada for several miles looking for a dirt road that would approach the site. After several false starts that ended at a stream, I went down a ranch lane about two miles from Ibapah. The lane bridged the stream. I asked permission to follow a track that I could see going up through the sagebrush past the ranch house and was asked only to be sure to close all the gates. Actually, there was only one. I proceeded on a dirt track to within about .6 mile from the site and proceeded on foot through the sagebrush and brambles. You'll want long pants past this point if you want to avoid legs that look like mine do today.

I located the confluence in a swale with a little bit of a "seep". There is standing water but enough tufts of grass to step on to get around without too much trouble. At the site I drove an oaken stake into the ground showing the lats and lons, took several pictures and left a plastic container with a description as well as a log for future visitors.

On leaving I stopped at the ranch house to thank them and assure them that the gate was closed. I told them more about the project and that others might come to visit the site.

I also listed the site as a Geocache. See www.Geocaching.com.


 All pictures
#1: North from confluence
#2: East from confluence
#3: South from confluence
#4: West from confluence
#5: Deep Creek Mountains looking SE from confluence
#6: Oak stake showing lats & lons, GPS, and compass
#7: GPS showing 40 degrees North by 114 degrees West
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)