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the Degree Confluence Project
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United States : Arizona

7.3 miles (11.7 km) SSW of Young, Gila, AZ, USA
Approx. altitude: 1666 m (5465 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo aerial world confnav)
Antipode: 34°S 69°E

Accuracy: 4 m (13 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: View North (across the gully) #3: View East (along the slope) #4: View South (up the slope) #5: View West (along the slope, into the late-afternoon sun) #6: All zeros! #7: Ancient cliff dwellings in Tonto National Monument, near Lake Theodore Roosevelt, south of the confluence point

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  34°N 111°W (visit #3)  

#1: The confluence point lies among downed trees on a north-facing slope.  (A rock cairn - left by previous visitors - marks the point.)

(visited by Ross Finlayson)

02-Oct-2014 -- This confluence point had been visited only twice before; the last time more than 9 years ago. That's not too surprising, as it's located in a very sparsely-populated region of Arizona that requires a long drive from the Phoenix metro area. Nonetheless, at the end of the drive, you find yourself only 0.7 miles from the confluence point, with just an easy hike remaining.

Driving from Scottsdale, I first visited the ancient cliff dwellings in Tonto National Monument, near Theodore Roosevelt Lake, then turned north onto Arizona Highway 288. I then took this rural road northward for a rather tedious 38 miles. The drive wasn't as bad as I had feared, however, because at least half of this road turned out to be paved, and even the unpaved sections were wide and smooth.

I then turned westward onto forest road 416, which heads towards the confluence point. (This road was much rougher than highway 288; however, a 2WD vehicle could probably handle it, if driven carefully.) From reviewing satellite imagery and reading the report from the previous visitors (Scott Surgent and Beth Cousland), I could tell that it was best to start hiking westward from the point where the road crosses the 34 degrees North line of latitude. This avoids having to cross a deep gully that runs east-west, just north of the confluence point. The 0.7 mile (each way) hike turned out to be very easy, as it followed a grassy ridgeline. (It was clear that vehicles - of some form - had passed along this ridge sometime in the past.)

The confluence point itself lies among downed trees on a north-facing slope, near the edge of the gully. A small rock cairn - left by previous visitors - marks the point. (I didn't see (but also didn't look for) a 'geocache', as I don't care about such things.)

Here is a remote-controlled aerial video of this confluence point.


 All pictures
#1: The confluence point lies among downed trees on a north-facing slope. (A rock cairn - left by previous visitors - marks the point.)
#2: View North (across the gully)
#3: View East (along the slope)
#4: View South (up the slope)
#5: View West (along the slope, into the late-afternoon sun)
#6: All zeros!
#7: Ancient cliff dwellings in Tonto National Monument, near Lake Theodore Roosevelt, south of the confluence point
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)