W
NW
N
N
NE
W
the Degree Confluence Project
E
SW
S
S
SE
E

United Kingdom : England

3.8 km (2.4 miles) ESE of Rylstone, North Yorkshire, England, UK
Approx. altitude: 401 m (1315 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 54°S 178°E

Accuracy: 3 m (9 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: view of ridge from parking lot #3: access information for Barden Moor and Barden Fell #4: map of Barden Moor and Barden Fell #5: rock fence on moor, with reservoir in background #6: looking down the hill at some of the shooting butts #7: East #8: South #9: West #10: GPS receivers #11: ground cover: moss, heather, bog cotton, ferns #12: view from Deer Gallows #13: Gordon in the ferns #14: tracklog in Google Earth

  { Main | Search | Countries | Information | Member Page | Random }

  54°N 2°W (visit #7) (secondary) 

#1: North

(visited by Dave Patton and Gordon Spence)

14-Jul-2008 --

Dave's narrative:

After visiting 54°N 1°W Gordon 'drove west', and a couple of hours later we were ready to start our hike to 54°N 2°W.

From the parking lot, we walked along the west side of the Embsay Reservoir, which in addition to providing a water source, is used for sailing and fishing. Just past the reservoir is a sign that has access information and a map for Barden Moor and Barden Fell, which are part of the Bolton Abbey Estate.

The confluence lies within Barden Moor. One advantage of visiting a confluence with someone who has been there before is their knowledge of what to do, or what not to do. In this case, Gordon suggested that the 'straight up the hill' approach that he had used in a previous visit might not be the best, as the pleaseant looking slope leading up to the ridge is in fact covered with high ferns that make walking difficult.

We decided to start by taking the path along the west side of the moor that goes to Crookrise Crag. As can be seen from our tracklog shown on Google Earth, we initially went the wrong way, walking along the road to some farm buildings.

Back near the sign we found the path, and followed it over to where it climbs the hillside, next to the dry stone wall used as a fence for the moor. Apparently there is some good bouldering along this path. Once we felt we were at a suitable elevation, we headed east across Deer Gallows Plain in the general direction of the confluence.

As we walked across the moor, a number of times we were startled by grouse that would fly up out of the heather, but not until we were a few feet away from them. Part way across the plain we crossed a line of shooting butts. Presumably these are used during shooting season, but they can be built and used for other purposes. If you have an Ordnance Survey map of the moor area, you may notice other lines of butts, marked as "Grouse Butts".

We continued across the moor, and carefully approached the confluence. We were being carefull because we were trying not to get too wet, which isn't surprising, as the confluence is located at the northwest corner of Wayshaw Bogs.

After the usual 'confluence dance' to get all zeros on the GPS receivers, and the confluence photos, including the ground cover in the area of the confluence, we headed back in the general direction of the car. Once we reached a path we followed it to the west, to the rock formation on the ridge, known as Deer Gallows. The view would have been even nicer on a sunny day.

From there we decided to head downhill, which consisted of negotiating some boggy areas followed by a descent through 'the ferns', which was interesting, as they were chest high in most places. At the bottom of the hill we followed the pathway west along the reservoir, and then walked back along the bridleway to the parking lot.

The next confluence on this trip was 52°N 0.

Gordon's narrative:

The first point for the day (54N-01W) having already been conquered, it was head out West through Harrogate. Couldn't work out why the traffic was so heavy until I saw a sign for the Yorkshire County Show...

About an hour and a bit after leaving York we pulled up in the car park at Embsay, a quick change back into walking boots - bit hard to drive in them - we get ready for some exercise.

I knew from looking at Google Earth that there was what looked like a track that went up the left hand side of the hill. Problem would be in finding it, there are a lot of ferns, a lot of sheep and very few people.

We stopped and looked at the map on a large noticeboard, identfiying a footpath to the left, back through the gate and off straight into a farmyard with no obvious exit routes. Hmmm...perhaps my Plan A (done twice before) of a frontal assault straight up the hill might come into play. Back to the map and read it closely this time and we managed to identify the correct track.

It did indeed go up the side of the hill, past countless sheep, most of which had both been shorn and "covered". Eventually we reached what was pretty much the top of the hill and struck out in a straight line for the point. About half way across the top we found a string of what looked like hides, but they were only semi-circles and were numbered. Dave thought they mide be shelters for the sheep, not quite sure I believe that myself, they breed 'em tough round 'ere you know :-)

Onwards to the CP, I had warned Dave that the CP was in the middle of Wadeshaw Bogs and despite it being July it would be really quite wet underfoot. It certainly was!

Documentation done and we headed out along the front of the ridge, stopping at a curious rock formation for a good look. We went a bit further on before I decided that the direct approach was best. Turn left and just march straight down the front of the hill! Total distance 3.2 miles, altitude gain 628 feet and time taken 3hr 56 mins

Back to the car and the 180 mile drive home, before going round for a nice meal at one of my local pubs The 'Ock 'n' Dough. I bade Dave goodnight and headed off for a good nights sleep ready for tomorrow and a triple confluence day, starting at the most visited spot in the world; 52N-00


 All pictures
#1: North
#2: view of ridge from parking lot
#3: access information for Barden Moor and Barden Fell
#4: map of Barden Moor and Barden Fell
#5: rock fence on moor, with reservoir in background
#6: looking down the hill at some of the shooting butts
#7: East
#8: South
#9: West
#10: GPS receivers
#11: ground cover: moss, heather, bog cotton, ferns
#12: view from Deer Gallows
#13: Gordon in the ferns
#14: tracklog in Google Earth
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)
  Notes
In the Yorkshire Dales National Park.