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the Degree Confluence Project
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Canada : Ontario

0.4 km (0.3 miles) SW of Ashburn, ON, Canada
Approx. altitude: 250 m (820 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo topo250 world confnav)
Antipode: 44°S 101°E

Accuracy: 34 m (111 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: Looking East #3: Looking North #4: Looking South #5: Slightly fuzzy GPS reading (but still legible enough) #6: David and Patrick with the confluence in the background

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  44°N 79°W (visit #3)  

#1: View to the West - the actual confluence is in this shot - from the foot prints it looks like the groundhog might have beaten us to it

(visited by Hugh Wallis, Flora, David and Patrick)

18-Jan-2004 -- Having recently heard about the Degree Confluence project on tv and, coincidentally, having just purchased two Garmin RINO 120s and being super eager to try them out for real, we decided to go geocaching now that the temperature had risen from the bitter minus 27° C we had earlier in the week to a balmy minus 3° C. However, before tracking down our first geocache we realized that the nearest Degree Confluence to us was very close to the Durham Regional Forest where hidden things awaited us and, in fact, right beside a road that we frequently drive along. Seeing as how the earlier visits had been done in warmer weather we thought it would be good to provide a winter perspective on this confluence. Also the earlier visitors hadn’t managed to get the coveted "all zeros" on the GPS so we figured we would give it a try.

So, we gathered up all our stuff and invited our neighbour’s son Patrick to come along to and headed off. Everyone was very excited when the GPS told us we were less than 15 seconds travel time away from the confluence and we pulled to the side of the road to try and identify the appropriate landowner to obtain permission from to reach the actual spot. No-one home at the first house but we were lucky next door and obtained permission to enter the back yard with no problems. Well, we all trudged through the snow to the fence and found that we were still about 35m away – still it was within the allowable bounds of error and it appeared that the actual point was in a field behind the house which would require finding the right farmer and take an age. The boys were eager to get on to where they could actually swap real "stuff" rather than just find an artificial point on the surface of the globe so we elected to make this "do" for now (although I am secretly harbouring an ambition to go back and find the right landowner at a later date!!)

So, we took the photos N, S, W, and E taking care with the N one not to invade the privacy of the landowner who had so kindly given us permission to enter their land and so we made sure the house did not appear in the photo. Getting the digital camera to focus on the GPS properly was a challenge since the sun light and reflection off the snow was so bright that we couldn't see the preview screen properly. Still, hopefully the resulting photo is still readable enough. The actual confluence point appeared to be slightly to the SW of where we were and there appeared to be footprints in the snow leading almost directly to it but we think this was probably some animal not a human – there was speculation about whether groundhogs had caught on to the sport of confluence hunting.


 All pictures
#1: View to the West - the actual confluence is in this shot - from the foot prints it looks like the groundhog might have beaten us to it
#2: Looking East
#3: Looking North
#4: Looking South
#5: Slightly fuzzy GPS reading (but still legible enough)
#6: David and Patrick with the confluence in the background
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)