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the Degree Confluence Project
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United States : Idaho

2.8 miles (4.5 km) SSW of Weston, Franklin, ID, USA
Approx. altitude: 1694 m (5557 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap topo aerial world confnav)
Antipode: 42°S 68°E

Accuracy: 10 m (32 ft)
Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: looking west into northern Utah #3: we found it! #4: the two GPS screens at the confluence #5: all the people except Stephen (looking east from the point) #6: looking east into Cache Valley, Utah from atop Bergeson Hill

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  42°N 112°W (visit #3)  

#1: looking north into southern Idaho

(visited by David Mower, Jeanene Budge, Rod Budge, Roy Isom, Mac Isom, Sandy Isom, Pete Isom, Carol Isom, Diane Mower, Evan Koller and Stephen Budge)

14-Oct-2002 -- Success! This was my second attempt at this confluence. What a great day! We had a rather large group of extended family members in attendance. Here is the story.

We left Logan, Utah at about noon and traveled to Cornish, Utah where we met Evan Koller (pronounced KOH-ler). He owns the land where the confluence is located.

We met him at his farmstead where he was working on a piece of equipment. He wondered why anyone would want to go to an imaginary point on the earth. After a brief conversation we agreed to a joint guiding expedition. We showed him the general area of the confluence on a map. He agreed to take us to that area. Then we would use two GPS units to guide him and all the rest of us to the confluence point. We traveled in one pickup truck and two SUVs on roads that Evan himself had built.

The confluence is near Bergeson Hill, so we stopped there on the way. Four-wheel drive was required, but we drove right to the summit. The views were magnificent in all directions. One nearby hill bore a striking reminder of ancient Lake Bonneville – a still-visible shoreline. There was a USGS benchmark on the summit, which I photographed and later logged at www.geocaching.com.

We drove off the summit and continued toward the confluence. We parked at the closest spot. The GPS units were pointing us to the west, which was down a fairly steep hill. There were eleven in our group, ranging in age from 70-ish to 3 years old. The horizontal distance to be covered was about 150 feet, but it was probably closer to 250 feet down the hill.

We had two Garmin GPS units, a GPS III Plus and an Etrex Summit. They zeroed out about 10-15 feet from each other. Satellite coverage was rather weak since we were on such a steep hill. We used the III Plus for the confluence dance and the photos. It was about 2:00 PM. The day was warm and sunny. It was a little hazy. We celebrated with huzzahs and raised arms.

We drove back to Evan’s farmstead where we had a pleasant farewell conversation.

My thanks to my nephew Pete Isom. He farms a piece of ground next-door to Evan. Pete did the ground work so that we could meet Evan. Good job, Pete! Our thanks to Evan for taking more than two hours out of his day to go with us. He has some beautiful dry-farm land. Evan, you were a gracious host. Thank you! Finally, thanks to all the members of our confluence-hunting team: Diane, my wife; Jeanene Budge, my sister, her husband Rod and their son, Stephen; Carol Isom, my sister, her son Pete Isom, Pete’s wife Sandy and their two boys Mac and Roy.

It's always better to explore than to wander. What a great day!

 All pictures
#1: looking north into southern Idaho
#2: looking west into northern Utah
#3: we found it!
#4: the two GPS screens at the confluence
#5: all the people except Stephen (looking east from the point)
#6: looking east into Cache Valley, Utah from atop Bergeson Hill
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)