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the Degree Confluence Project
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United Kingdom : England

2.1 km (1.3 miles) NNW of Aydon, Northumberland, England, UK
Approx. altitude: 126 m (413 ft)
([?] maps: Google MapQuest Multimap world confnav)
Antipode: 55°S 178°E

Click on any of the images for the full-sized picture.

#2: driving along the path of the Hadrian's Wall #3: a poppy field near the confluence #4: a small river about 400 metres SW of the confluence #5: GPS #6: view to the East #7: view to the South #8: view to the West #9: Captain Peter and two horses #10: the "Royal Hexham Hotel", where we spent overnight

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  55°N 2°W (visit #4) (secondary) 

#1: Aydon Castle seen from the confluence

(visited by Captain Peter and Werner Furlan)

09-Jun-2004 -- This morning we left Keswick in Cumbria and drove via Carlisle along the Hadrian's Wall towards East. In 43 A.D. Britannia (roughly today's England) became a part of the Roman Empire, and since then the Romans had begun to secure the border against the Celtic tribes in the North (especially the Brigantes). In 122 A.D. Emperor Hadrian had visited Britannia and on this occasion he gave the order to built a strong fortification, extending from the North Sea to the Irish Sea, and consisting of a ditch and a wall equipped with turrets and a chain of small castles. In 124 A.D. it had already a length of 118 km and in 138 A.D. the wall was completed. According to an ancient writer the purpose of this wall was to separate the Romans from the barbaric tribes, and contrary to a similar construction in Germany ("Limes") no major conflicts on this wall have been reported for a long period, except when in 180 A.D. the Caledonians attacked the Romans. But they could be rejected successfully. After 260 A.D. the Pictes arrived from Scotland and from this moment the Romans had to permanently defend themselves. Due to the troubles and civil wars in the continental Roman Empire more and more Roman troops were withdrawn from Britannia and in all likelihood there were no longer any left after 400 A.D. Thus, contrary to the Limes in Germany, the Hadrian's Wall was never subject to destruction due to warlike activities. Most castles along the Hadrian's Wall, however, have been destroyed by fire.

Passing through this wonderful scenery we finally arrived at the confluence area near Halton, where we saw a beautiful poppy field. We parked the car in a small forest close to a small river.

After a short walk we arrived at the confluence, from where we saw Aydon Castle.

The views to North, East, South and West look quite similar, and on the way back to the road to Hexham we passed two horses - a white and a brown one.

At 6 p.m. we arrived at the "Royal Hexham Hotel" for overnight.


 All pictures
#1: Aydon Castle seen from the confluence
#2: driving along the path of the Hadrian's Wall
#3: a poppy field near the confluence
#4: a small river about 400 metres SW of the confluence
#5: GPS
#6: view to the East
#7: view to the South
#8: view to the West
#9: Captain Peter and two horses
#10: the "Royal Hexham Hotel", where we spent overnight
ALL: All pictures on one page (broadband access recommended)